When Cleaning Makes Things Worse – Making polluters pay for poisoned water

I read a great article by Walter Mugdan the EPA's Director of Emergency Response, about how toxic and dangerous cleaning fluids like Perc can be when they are allowed to contaminate  public water supplies. Much US water and air was contaminated by toxic chemicals like Perchlorethylene, a chlorinated solvent, which was verywidely used in dry … Continue reading When Cleaning Makes Things Worse – Making polluters pay for poisoned water

Government Believes that “Population Mixing” Can Seriously Damage YOUR Child’s Health – #StopMoorside

Is replacing Sellafield worth it? UK MP Tim Farron MP is to quiz  the Director of Public Health Cumbria on how a new nuclear reactor  planned for #Moorside will affect the health of children in the vicinity Source: Government Believes that "Population Mixing" Can Seriously Damage YOUR Child's Health - #StopMoorside

Although 3.2 million people marched in towns across the US many local papers ignored them

On Jan. 21, an estimated 3.2 million Americans took to the streets for Women’s March protests. Given the sheer scale of the protests, it would be reasonable to assume they led headlines across the US. In reality, a significant number of American newspapers chose not to feature the story on their Sunday front pages—a striking… via … Continue reading Although 3.2 million people marched in towns across the US many local papers ignored them

Ray Keogh – A forgotten pioneer in Irish football

Ray got to play in front of big crowds, win league titles, compete in cup finals, play in Europe against the likes of Bayern Munich, and represent his league in prestigious games. He was a local icon but because of the era he played in, the strange role that domestic football played in Irish society at the time, and the lack of surviving TV footage, Ray is mainly remembered these days by groups of ageing Drumcondra fans who hold on to memories of a club that disappeared from senior league football back in 1972.

aBohemianSportingLife

It was on a still, sunny November afternoon last year on the approach to the Aviva Stadium (Lansdowne Road as was) that I spotted Paul McGrath. Paul was, like the rest of the crowd, on his way to the FAI Cup final between Derry City and his former club, St. Patrick’s Athletic. He is of course no stranger to the old ground; he strode its turf with gazelle-like grace over the course of his 12 year international career, and it was his performances in a green shirt that have ensured his status as a sporting legend in Ireland.  Despite his much publicised personal problems, or perhaps because of them, Paul is not only respected by the Irish public, but genuinely loved. It is that hint of vulnerability that was so at odds with his commanding, assured performances, that has struck such a chord with football fans.

He was my footballing…

View original post 2,372 more words

A Day In The Life of an Industrial School Boy

Industrial schools were places where every aspect of life was designed to punish. Most of the kids there had done little wrong except be born poorBut really everything about those places was a PUNISHMENT.

From the isolation from society, to the regimentation of little children – being forced to march from one place to another, children being forced to stand to attention in the yard semi-naked while the “nurse” inspected us OR, if the notion took her, have a good few of us scrubbed down with purple or brown iodine. Being forced to say rosaries was a PUNISHMENT, being forced violently to run around the yard with a lighted candle at night in the rain was a PUNISHMENT. Being forced violently to scrub toilets with your own toothbrush was a PUNISHMENT.

The Ragged Wagon

When I was recently asked about punishments in those places by someone who was never in those places I think she expected an answer like: “well they used they’re hands or fists to box us or clatter us, their feet to boot us and they used blackthorn sticks or big leather belts for more formal punishments.” Sounds like an answer that couldn’t be denied, even she could relate to those types of punishments. She was around 40 years old and she was from the era of corporal punishment. But that wasn’t the answer I gave her.

In those places EVERYTHING was part of your punishment. Mealtimes were a PUNISHMENT. Our food was vile, it really would have been illegal AND cruel to feed pigs on what we “survived” on. Our main food really was bread and dripping. And the dripping wasn’t the nice white strained stuff you’d see on the…

View original post 1,521 more words